Bellyside Hill & Bellyside Crag

The ridge on Bellyside Hill with outcrops of the Marginal dioritic rock.

The ridge on Bellyside Hill with outcrops of the ‘Marginal’ dioritic rock type

Map showing the excursion route, locations and igneous rock types.

Bellyside Hill Excursion Map
Key for the excursion map

Rather than walking over to Bellyside Hill via the Hawsen Burn – Lambden Burn route, or via the track between upper Cheviot and Goldscleugh farm that goes by Woolhope Crag, we take the easy option of buying a 10.00 GDP day permit from Savills, Glendale Road, Wooler and drive up the College Valley to Dunsdale.
Our main aim is to investigate the bedrock that outcrops above the 550m contour on Bellyside Hill that is shown, on current BGS maps, to be part of the northern limit of Cheviot pluton.
Having said that, back in 1932, Carruthers and Anderson wrote, ‘South of the Lambden Burn on Bellyside Hill, above the 1,500-ft. contour, there are several fairly distinct features which maintain a rude parallelism round the hill. Though exposures are few, these all seem to be in good, black andesite and contrast sharply with the even slopes of the neighbouring and higher granite ground on The Cheviot.’ However, Jhingran (1943) mapped these exposures as being of the ‘Marginal’ dioritic type similar to those close to the granite-andesite junction to the south-east of the pluton, on Dunmoor Hill and to the south-west in the Breamish Valley. Robson (1976) and Al-Hafdh (1985) agreed with Jhingran although Al-Hafdh also identified samples taken nearby on the slopes of Mid Hill as being of his felsic, sub-equigranular ‘Woolhope’ type.
A second aim is to find and examine the andesite outlier that is mapped at the head of Goldscleugh.

Location 1. Outcrop of ‘Marginal’ dioritic rock

The first outcrop of Marginal dioritic rock on Bellyside Hill that we sample, NT910218.

The first outcrop of Marginal dioritic rock on Bellyside Hill that we sample, NT910218
The slopes of the Cheviot peat bog are in the background.

Having parked the car out of the way near Dunsdale, we set off on a distinct track up Bellyside Hill. It makes an enjoyable change to be walking on a route in the Cheviots that has the character of a ridge and soon we are enjoying views cross the Lambden and College Valleys to the hills beyond.
The rock at location 1 is typically ‘Marginal’ in character with a high proportion of plagioclase to alkali feldspar, a high pyroxene content, and as we have seen in the ‘Marginal’ rock adjacent to the lavas on Dunmoor Hill, an absence of biotite with many the many crystalline inclusions characteristic of primary biotite. However, there are some small flakes of inclusion-free secondary biotite that fringe the many altered pyroxene crystals.

Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hill, NT910218. Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (48mm across)

Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hill, NT910218
Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (48mm across)

Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hill, NT910218. Thin section viewed in plane polarised light (45mm across)

A thin section from the same sample viewed in plane polarised light

Marginal type on Bellyside Hill, NT910218. Thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters (45mm across)

The same thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters

General view of the rock in thin section Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm) Plagioclase, with orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene dominant with micrographic interstitial quartz and alkali feldspar, secondary biotite and amphibole, magnetite and limonite.

General view of the rock in thin section
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)
Plagioclase, with orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene dominant with micrographic interstitial quartz and alkali feldspar, secondary biotite and amphibole, magnetite and limonite.

General view of the rock in thin section Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm.) Plagioclase, with orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene dominant with micrographic interstitial quartz and alkali feldspar, secondary biotite and amphibole, magnetite and limonite.

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Orthopyroxene with mostly plagioclase in Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hill. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Orthopyroxene with mostly plagioclase
Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

An orthopyroxene crystal in Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hill. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

An orthopyroxene crystal at 45o
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

An orthopyroxene crystal in Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hill. Section viewed in plane polarised light - rotated to 90 degrees (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

The same orthopyroxene crystal rotated to 90o viewed in plane polarised light
In this position relative to the direction of polarised light, the crystal takes on a red hue.

An orthopyroxene crystal in Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hill. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

The same crystal viewed with crossed polarising filters

An orthopyroxene and a clinopyroxene with secondary biotite and magnetite in Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hill. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

An orthopyroxene and a clinopyroxene with secondary biotite and magnetite in Marginal dioritic rock at location 1
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

An orthopyroxene and a clinopyroxene with secondary biotite and magnetite in Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hill. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Comparison with other rocks of the same type and a contrast with the ‘Central Belt’ type

Like the ‘Marginal’ rocks to the south of the pluton, there is a range of crystal sizes from the very small to almost a medium-grain size. Some ‘Marginal’ rock have phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene in a fine-grained matrix whilst others are more equigranular. All these rocks share an apparent lack of primary biotite and low biotite content generally, what there is being flakes at the edge of altered pyroxenes – this is in contact to the ‘Central Belt’ rocks that do have large, primary biotite crystals.

General view of the rock in thin section Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm.) Plagioclase, with orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene dominant with micrographic interstitial quartz and alkali feldspar, secondary biotite and amphibole, magnetite and limonite.

‘Marginal’ rock at this location
This rock has some much finer-grained crystals as well as micrographic quartz and feldspar indicative of a period of more rapid cooling.

General appearance of the Marginal rock at Cunyon Crag. Its biotite has very few inclusions and is in in association with altered pyroxene. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

General appearance of the ‘Marginal’ rock at Cunyon Crag
Its biotite has very few inclusions and is in close association with altered pyroxene.
Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Central Belt rock from Dunmoor Hill viewed at the same magnification. The rock is coarser-grained and its biotite is inclusion-rich, suggesting it is primary in origin. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Central Belt rock from Dunmoor Hill viewed at the same magnification.
The rock is coarser-grained and its biotite is inclusion-rich, suggesting it is primary in origin.
Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Our second sampled outcrop of Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hill, NT910216

Our second sampled outcrop of Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hill, NT910216

We take a couple of samples here. The first is another example of the ‘Marginal’ rock that appears to be much the same as at location 1 although a thin section reveals some fine micrographic texture in the quartz and feldspar as well as the coarse texture that was in our first sample.
The second sample is of a red, felsic vein, one of a number that have been intruded into these rocks at the edge of the pluton. Thin sections reveal xenocrysts and xenoliths of the more mafic host rock in the felsic intrusion – small pieces that have been broken off the ‘Marginal’ rock and transported in the flow. We also find small amounts of tourmaline in the rock.

Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hil, NT910216. Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (45mm across)

Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hill NT910216
Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (45mm across)

Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hill, NT910218. Thin section viewed in plane polarised light (30mm across)

Thin section from the same sample viewed in plane polarised light

Fine-grained porphyritic granitic rock, Cheviot NT919210. Thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters (48mm across)

The same thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters

Plagioclase, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene with coarsely micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar, Bellyside Hill. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Plagioclase, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene with coarsely micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar, Bellyside Hill
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Plagioclase, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene with coarsely micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar, Bellyside Hill. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with coarsely micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar, Bellyside Hill. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with coarsely micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar, Bellyside Hill
Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with secondary biotite and magnetite in coarsely micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar, Bellyside Hill. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with secondary biotite and magnetite in coarsely micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar, Bellyside Hill
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Specimen 2

Orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with secondary biotite and magnetite in coarsely micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar, Bellyside Hill. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

The same crystals viewed with crossed polarising filters

Felsic intrusion, Bellyside Hill NT910216. Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (48mm across)

Felsic intrusion, Bellyside Hill NT910216
Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (48mm across)

Felsic intrusion, Bellyside Hill. Thin section viewed in plane polarised light (45mm across)

Thin section from the same sample viewed in plane polarised light

Felsic intrusion, Bellyside Hill. Thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters (45mm across)

The same thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters

Quartz in coarse and fine micrographic association with alkali feldspars with plagioclase and a few flakes of biotite. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Quartz in coarse and fine micrographic association with alkali feldspar together with plagioclase and a few biotiteflakes
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Quartz in coarse and fine micrographic association with alkali feldspars with plagioclase and a few flakes of biotite. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Coarse and fine micrographic texture in quartz and feldspar along with some perthite. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Coarse and fine micrographic texture in quartz and feldspar along with some perthite
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Coarse and fine micrographic texture in quartz and feldspar along with some perthite. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

An apatite crystal amongs other chloritised inclusions in feldspar phenocryst or microxenolith. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

An apatite crystal amongs other chloritised inclusions in feldspar phenocryst or microxenolith
Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Tourmaline and chlorite with quartz and alkali feldspar. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Tourmaline and chlorite with quartz and alkali feldspar
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Tourmaline and chlorite with quartz and alkali feldspar. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Location 3. Felsic intrusion into ‘Marginal’ dioritic rock

A red, felsic infusion intruded into Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Hill, NT910215

Red, felsic material that is intruded into Marginal dioritic rock at location 3, Bellyside Hill, NT910215

Veins of the red, felsic intrusive rock take our attention here. Once again, we see small pieces of the host rock torn off and carried away in the flow of the intrusion confirming that the ‘Marginal’ rock had crystallised before the intrusion. Further, a thin section shows there the intrusive rock chilled against the host. A kinked biotite crystal, similar to those seen in the ‘Marginal’ rock above High Bleakhope, evidences the forces at work in the process of intrusion.

Felsic intrusion into Marginal granitic rock, Bellyside Hill, NT910215. Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (50mm across)

Felsic intrusion into Marginal granitic rock, Bellyside Hill, NT910215
Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (50mm across)

Felsic intrusion into Marginal granitic rock, Bellyside Hill. Thin section viewed in plane polarised light (47mm across)

Thin section from the same sample viewed in plane polarised light

Felsic intrusion into Marginal granitic rock, Bellyside Hill. Thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters (47mm across)

The same thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters

Xenoliths and xenocrystals of host rock carried in fine-grained felsic dyke material. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Xenoliths and xenocrystals of host rock carried in fine-grained felsic dyke material
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Xenoliths and xenocrystals of host rock carried in fine-grained felsic dyke material. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Kinked secondary biotite at the edge of pyroxene. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

Kinked secondary biotite at the edge of pyroxene
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

Kinked secondary biotite at the edge of pyroxene. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Chilling of the intrusive rock against the host. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Chilling of the intrusive rock against the host
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Chilling of the intrusive rock against the host. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Locations 4. Boulder at the head of Goldscleugh

Head of Goldscleugh, NT910209. Andesite is shown here on BGS maps.

Head of Goldscleugh, NT910209
An andesite inlier is shown here on BGS maps.

Our next location will be at the head of Goldscleugh where we hope to find an outcrop of the andesite inlier shown on the BGS map. As we climb, the path soon becomes indistinct and then disappears completely and so we make our way over rough ground to the large boulders that litter the upper part of the cleugh.
We can’t find an outcrop and not one of the boulders we inspect appears to be andesitic – so we make do with a sample from a very large boulder that we hope hasn’t travelled far.
This rock is more of the ‘Marginal’ type – but interesting on account of it being similar to the ‘Marginal’ rock found at the southern edge of the pluton that contains thin veins of black, glassy to fine-grained mafic material. We haven’t found thick veins of this material as we do with the red, felsic sort. Thin sections reveal clear flow structures in this vein material around numerous pieces of the host rock.

Marginal dioritic rock, Head of Goldscleugh, NT910209. Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (48mm across)

Marginal dioritic rock, Head of Goldscleugh, NT910209
Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (48mm across)

Marginal dioritic rock, Head of Goldscleugh, NT910209. Thin section viewed in plane polarised light (48mm across)

Marginal dioritic rock, Head of Goldscleugh, NT910209
Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (48mm across).

Marginal dioritic rock, Head of Goldscleugh, NT910209. Thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters (48mm across)

The same thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters

Vein of glassy, opaque-rich material in Marginal dioritic rock. Section viewed in plane polarised light(FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Vein of glassy, opaque-rich material in Marginal dioritic rock
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Vein of glassy, opaque-rich material in Marginal dioritic rock. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

The vein viewed with crossed polarising filters

Vein of glassy, opaque-rich material in Marginal dioritic rock. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Another part of the same vein
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Vein of glassy, opaque-rich material in Marginal dioritic rock. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters(FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Vein of glassy, opaque-rich material in Marginal dioritic rock. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Vein of glassy, opaque-rich material in ‘Marginal’ dioritic rock
Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Calcite in Marginal dioritic rock. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

Calcite in this sample of ‘Marginal’ dioritic rock
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

Calcite in Marginal dioritic rock. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Pyroxene in Marginal dioritic rock. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

Pyroxene in this sample of ‘Marginal’ dioritic rock
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

Pyroxene in Marginal dioritic rock. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Locations 5. Cobbles in the peat to the west of Goldscleugh

We leave the head of Goldscleugh and weave our way through the vegetation over to Bellyside Crag. As we go, we look for evidence for the andesite inlier but we don’t find any. We do sample a couple of cobbles found in an eroded area of peat. The first is a surprisingly fresh piece of ‘Marginal’ rock. The second is a thoroughly altered, yellowish rock that proves to be extensively sericitised and full of muscovite.

Marginal granitic rock, Goldcleugh, NT910208. Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (48mm across)

Marginal granitic rock, Goldscleugh, NT910208
Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (48mm across)

Marginal granitic rock, Goldcleugh, Thin section viewed in plane polarised light (15mm across)

A thin section from the same sample viewed in plane polarised light

Marginal granitic rock, Goldcleugh, Thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters (15mm across)

The same thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters

Plagioclase, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with quartz and alkali feldspar, magnetite and secondary biotite in Marginal dioritic rock, Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Plagioclase, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with quartz and alkali feldspar, magnetite and secondary biotite in ‘Marginal’ dioritic rock
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Plagioclase, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with quartz and alkali feldspar, magnetite and secondary biotite in Marginal dioritic rock, Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Secondary biotite associated with altered orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Secondary biotite associated with altered orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Secondary biotite associated with altered orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Secondary biotite in association with altered orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Secondary biotite in association with altered orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Sample 2

Secondary biotite in association with altered orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Altered rock, Goldscleugh, NT910208 Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (50mm across)

Altered rock, Goldscleugh, NT910208
Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (50mm across)

Altered rock, Goldscleugh, NT910208. Thin section viewed in plane polarised light (47mm across)

A thin section from the same sample viewed in plane polarised light

Altered rock, Goldscleugh, NT910208. Thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters (47mm across)

The same thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters

Muscovite (sericite) in intensely altered rock with quartz and feldspar. Section viewed in plane polarised light ((FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Muscovite (sericite) in intensely altered rock with quartz and feldspar
Section viewed in plane polarised light ((FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Muscovite (sericite) in intensely altered rock with quartz and feldspar. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters ((FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Muscovite (sericite) in intensely altered rock with quartz and feldspar. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Muscovite (sericite) in intensely altered rock with quartz and feldspar
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Muscovite (sericite) in intensely altered rock with quartz and feldspar. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Muscovite (sericite), opaque iron-titanium oxides and transparent iron staining in intensely altered rock. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

Muscovite (sericite), opaque iron-titanium oxides and transparent iron staining in intensely altered rock
Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 1.2 x 0.8 mm)

Location 6. Bellyside Crag

Bellyside Crag, NT905211

Bellyside Crag, NT905211

We head west over rough ground to Bellyside Crag.
The crag is a small one but with fine views over the College and Lambden Valleys and the andesite hills to the north. The ‘Marginal’ rock here is much the same as that in the outcrops on the hillside. It has a dioritic character with a wide range in crystal size, a good deal of pyroxene and opaque iron-titanium oxides and no sign of primary biotite. Secondary biotite occurs as small flakes with magnetite around altered pyroxene crystals. Quartz also occurs with alkali feldspar in coarse and fine micrographic textures.

Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Crag, NT905211. Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (48mm across)

Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Crag, NT905211
Prepared hand specimen in ordinary reflected light (48mm across)

Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Crag, NT910218. Thin section viewed in plane polarised light (48mm across)

A thin section from the same sample viewed in plane polarised light

Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Crags. Thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters (48mm across)

The same thin section viewed with crossed polarising filters

Pyroxenes, plagioclase with coarsely micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar with opaques in Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Crag. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Pyroxenes, plagioclase with coarsely micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar with opaques in Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Crag
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

Pyroxenes, plagioclase with coarsely micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar with opaques in Marginal dioritic rock, Bellyside Crag. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 4.6 x 3.0 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Secondary biotite fringing altered orthopyroxene. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Secondary biotite fringing altered orthopyroxene
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Secondary biotite fringing altered orthopyroxene. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Partially albitised plagioclase crystals, Bellyside Crag. Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Partially albitised plagioclase crystals, Bellyside Crag
Section viewed in plane polarised light (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Partially albitised plagioclase crystals, Bellyside Crag. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

The same area viewed with crossed polarising filters

Orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar with opaques, Bellyside Crag. Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

Orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with micrographic quartz and alkali feldspar with opaques, Bellyside Crag
Section viewed with crossed polarising filters (FoV 2.3 x 1.5 mm)

References

Al-Hafdh N.M. 1985. The Alteration Petrology of the Cheviot Granite. Thesis submitted for PhD. at Newcastle University.

British Geological Survey Online geology map http://mapapps.bgs.ac.uk/geologyofbritain/home.html

Carruthers, R G, Burnett, G A, Anderson, W, and Thomas, HH,1932. The Geology of the Cheviot Hills (Based on the work of C.T. Clough and W. Gunn) HMSO

Jhingran, A.G .1943. The Cheviot Granite. Reprint from the Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London, Vol. 98, pp, 240-254.

Robson, D.A.. 1976. A Guide to the Geology of the Cheviot Hills. Natural History Society of Northumbria, The Hancock Museum, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Vol. 43, 1.

No vestige of a beginning, – no prospect of an end

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